Home Palace Directory Members Join Contact
 

Palace Chat: Its a lively community

No Gimmicks No Hassles

Free Chat is Back

Download Palace Client
Register Palace Client
Enter Palace

Gorean Quotes: We have over 800 quotes to help you find what you are looking for.

Page: 3 of 42

First Previous Next Last
Gorean Quote Book Page
Even the proprietor slept, his head across his folded arms on the counter, behind which stood the great Kal-da brewing pots, at last empty and cold. Outlaw of Gor --pg. 80
It is said that below the mountains that Priest-Kings know all that occurs on Gor.' 'Nonsense,' said Misk. 'But perhaps I shall show you the Scanning Room someday, We have four hundred Priest-Kings who operate the scanners, and we are accordingly well informed. For example, if there is a violation of our weapons laws we usually, sooner or later, discover it and after determining the coordinates put into effect the Flame Death Mechanism.' I had once seen a man die the Flame Death, the High Initiate of Ar, on the roof of Ar's Cylinder of Justice, I shivered involuntarily. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 125
I once saw a man die the Flame Death,' I said 'Is that mechanism also in this room?' 'Yes,' said Sarm. indicating with one foreleg a quiet looking metal cabinet to one side possessing several dials and knobs. 'The projection points for the Flame Death are located in the surveillance craft,' said Sarm, 'but the coordinates are fixed and the firing signal is relayed from this room. The system is synchronized, of course, with the scanning apparatus and may be activated from any of the control panels at the observation cubes.' 'Of course,' I said. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 135
And yet it was not a strange thing, particularly not on Gor, where bravery is highly esteemed and to save a female's life is in effect to win title to it, for it is the option of a Gorean male to enslave any woman whose life he has saved, a right which is seldom denied even by the citizens of the girl's city or her family. The Gorean man, as a man, cheerfully and dutifully attends to the rescuing of his female in distress, but as a Gorean, as a true Gorean, he feels, perhaps justifiably and being somewhat less or more romantic than ourselves, that he should have something more for his pains than her kiss of gratitude and so, in typical Gorean fashion, puts his chain on the wench, claiming both her and her body as his payment. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 138
To one side there was a small altar to the Priest Kings, where burned a small fire. On this fire, at the beginning of the feast the feast steward had scattered some grains of meal, some salt, some drops of wine. 'Ta-Sardar-Gor,' he had said, and this phrase had been repeated by the others in the room. 'To the,Priest Kings of Gor.' It had been the general libation for the banquet. 'I am of the Caste of Warriors, and it is in our codes that the only death fit for a man is that in battle, but I can no longer believe that this is true, for the man I met once on the road to Ko-ro-ba died well, and taught me that all wisdom and truth does not lie in my own codes.' Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 14
He had been destroyed by the Priest-Kings as casually as one might jerk loose the thong of a sandal. He had disobeyed and he had been destroyed, immediately and with grotesque dispatch, but the important thing was, I told myself, that he had disobeyed, that he could disobey, that he had been able to disobey and choose the ignominious death he knew must follow. He had won his freedom though it had, as the Goreans say, led him to the Cities of Dust, where I think, not even the Priest-Kings care to follow. He had, as a man, lifted his fist against the might of the Priest-Kings and so he had died, defiantly, though horribly, with great nobility. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 14
I once asked a Gorean hunter whom I had met in Ar why the larl was hunted at all. I have never forgotten his reply. 'Because it is beautiful,' he said, ' and dangerous, and because we are Goreans.' Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 20
It is thus that, should all the spears miss their mark, he ( the Last Spear in the hunt of the larl) sacrifices his life for that of his companions who will, while the larl attacks him, make good their escape. this may seem cruel but in the long run it tends to be conservative of human life; it is better, as Goreans say, for one man to die then many. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 20
She knelt in the position of the Pleasure Slave but her hands on her thighs had unconsciously, pleadingly, turned their palms to me, and she no longer knelt quite back on her heels. It was as though she begged to be allowed to lift and open her arms and rise and come to my arms. But as I looked upon her sternly she turned her palms again to her thighs, knelt back on her heels and dropped her head, holding her eyes as if by force of will fixed on the plastic beneath my feet.' Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 234-235
Behind the Initiates, standing, as befits the men of other castes, I saw men of a hundred cities, joined here in their common fear and plea to the denizens of the Sardar. Well I could suppose the terror and upheavals that had brought these men, normally so divided against one another in the strife of their warring cities, to that palisade, to the dark shadows of the Sardar. I was pleased to see that the men of other castes, unlike the Initiates, did not grovel. There were men in that crowd from Ar, from Thentis, from Tharna, recognized by the yellow cords in their belt; from Port Kar; from Tor, Cos, Tyros; perhaps from Treve. Perhaps even from Ko-ro-ba. And the men in that crowd were of all castes, and even of castes as low as the Peasants, the Saddle-Makers, the Weavers, the Goat-Keepers, the Poets and the Merchants, but none of them groveled as did the Initiates; how strange, I thought. The Initiates claimed to be most like Priest-Kings, even to be formed in their image, and yet I knew that a Priest-King would never grovel; it seemed the Initiates, in their efforts to be like gods, behaved like slaves. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 294-295
With great suddenness I realized that what I knew, and what others knew, would make no difference to the world of Gor. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 298
`Until you find Talena,' he said, `your companion is peril and steel.' It was an old Warrior saying.' Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 307
The Gorean Male, at ease, usually sits cross-legged and the female kneels, resting back on her heals. the position of the Tower Slave, in which Vika now knelt, differs from that of a free woman only in the position of the wrists which are held before her and, when not occupied, crossed as though for binding. A free woman's wrists are never so placed. The position of the Pleasure Slave, incidentally, differs from the position of both the free woman and the Tower Slave. The hands of the Pleasure Slave normally rest upon her thighs but, in some cities, for example Thentis, I believe, they are crossed behind her. More significantly, for the free woman's may also rest upon her thighs, there is a difference in the placement of the knees. In all these kneeling positions incidentally, even that of the Pleasure Slave, the Gorean woman carries herself well; her back is straight and her chin is high. She tends to be vital and beautiful to look upon. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 46
Could it be that I had, as the Codes of my Caste recommended, not even considered her, but merely regarded her as a rightless animal, no more than a subject beast, an abject instrument to my interests and pleasures, a slave? Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 48
This harsh treatment, incidentally, when she is thought to deserve it, may even be inflicted on a free companion, in spite of the fact that she is free and usually much loved. According to the Gorean way of looking at things a taste of the slave ring is thought to be occasionally beneficial to all women, even the exalted free woman. Thus when she has been irritable or otherwise troublesome even a Free Companion may find herself at the foot of the couch looking forward to a pleasant night on the stones, stripped, with neither mat nor blanket, chained to the slave ring precisely as though she were a lowly slave girl. It is the Gorean way of reminding her, should she need to be reminded, that she, too, is a woman, and thus to be dominated, to be subject to men. Should she be tempted to forget this basic fact of Gorean life the slave ring set in the bottom of each Gorean couch is there to refresh her memory. Gor is a mans world. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 67
I would allow Vika to share the great stone couch, it's sleeping pelts, and silken sheets. This was unusual, however, for normally the Gorean Slave Girl sleeps at the foot of her Masters couch, often on a straw mat with only a thin, cotton-like blanket, woven from the soft fibers of the Rep plant, to protect her from the cold. If she has not pleased her Master of late, she may be, of course, as a disciplinary measure, simply chained nude to the slave ring in the bottom of the couch, sans both the blanket and the mat. The stones of the floor are hard and the Gorean nights cold and it is a rare girl who, when unchained in the morning, does not seek more dutifully to serve her master. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 67
Of Custom, a slave girl may not even ascend the couch to serve her Masters pleasure. The point of this restriction , I suppose, is to draw a clearer distinction between her status and that of a Free Companion. At any rate the dignities of the couch are, by custom, reserved for the Free Companion. When a Master wishes to make use of a slave girl he tells her to light the lamp of love which she obediently does, placing it in the window of his chamber that they may not be disturbed. then with his own hand he throws upon the floor of his chamber luxurious love furs, perhaps from the larl itself, and commands her to them. Priest Kings of Gor --pg. 68
The position of the Tower Slave, in which Vika knelt, differs from that of a free woman only in the position of the wrists which are held before her and, when not occupied, crossed as though for binding. A free woman's wrists are never so placed. Priest Kings of Gor --pg.46
The position of the Pleasure Slave, incidentally, differs from the position of both the free woman and the Tower Slave. The hands of a Pleasure Slave normally rest on her thighs but, in some cities, for example, Thentis, I believe, they are crossed behind her. More significantly, for the free woman's hands may also rest on her thighs, there is a difference in the placement of the knees. In all these kneeling positions, incidentally, even that of the Pleasure Slave, the Gorean woman carries herself well; her back is straight and her chin is high. She tends to be vital and beautiful to look upon. Priest Kings of Gor --pg.46-47
I could see he carried a small rounded shield, glossy, black, lacquered: he wore a conical, fur rimmed iron helmet, a net of colored chains depending from the helmet protecting his face, leaving only holes for the eyes. He wore a quilted jacket and under this a leather jerkin; the jacket was trimmed with fur and had a for collar; his boots were made of hide and also trimmed with fur; he had a wide, five-buckled belt. I could not see his face because of the net of chain that hung before it. I also noted, about his throat, now lowered, there was a soft leather wind scarf which might, when the helmet and veil was lifted, be drawn over the mouth and nose, against the wind and dust of his ride. He was very erect in the saddle. His lance remained on his back, but he carried in his right hand the small, powerful, horn bow of the Wagon Peoples and attached to his saddle was a lacquered, narrow, rectangular quiver containing as many as forty arrows. On the saddle there also hung, on one side, a coiled robe of braided bosk hide and, on the other, a long, three-weighted bola f the sort used in hunting tumits and men; in the saddle itself, on the right side, indicating the rider must be right handed, were the seven sheaths for the almost legendary quivas, the balanced saddle knives of the prairie. It was said a youth of the Wagon Peoples was taught the bow, the quiva, and the lance before their parents would consent to give them a name, for names are precious among the Wagon Peoples, as among Goreans in general, and they are not to be wasted on one who is likely to die, one who cannot handle the weapons of the hunt and war. Until the youth has mastered the bow, the quiva, and the lance he is simply known as first, or the second, and so on , son of such and such a father. Nomads of Gor --pg. 10-11

First Previous Next Last

Page: 3 of 42